Rhythmic gymnastics basic

Gymnastics Training For Beginners

Vital Stats

Name: Ryan Hurst
Occupation: Program director, Gold Medal Bodies Fitness
Location: Osaka, Japan

Gymnastics rings are showing up in more gyms than ever before. However, many people mistakenly believe these wooden implements are only useful for athletes who use them in competition, like gymnasts or CrossFit athletes. In reality, anyone can use the rings and benefit from them tremendously, because they help simultaneously build strength, stability, and coordination like no other apparatus.

If you've ever watched the gymnastics events at the Olympics, you know how much strength the rings require. What you may not know about the rings, though, is how effectively they can be used to build incredible muscular size and definition. The rings may not be the first tool that comes to mind if hypertrophy is your goal, but as the incredible physiques of elite gymnasts show, ring work can help pack muscle on the upper body.

Are they easy? No, but nothing worth pursuing is. If you're willing to start at the bottom and master the techniques and routines I outline here, you'll find they're a great tool for building a muscular upper body that's every bit as strong as it looks.

Getting Off The Ground

The primary exercises that I'll show you are leverage holds and fundamental pulls and pushes that emphasize control over the rings and your body.

For now, you won't be doing any swinging moves on the rings. Instead, the primary exercises that I'll show you are leverage holds and fundamental pulls and pushes that emphasize control over the rings and your body. You'll soon realize that these are the best for hypertrophy and muscle conditioning anyway.

Most of these moves are classics with which you're familiar, but not like this. Why would you need to watch another tutorial on doing a pull-up, row, or dip? The answer: Because everything is different on the rings.

It makes perfect sense when you think about it. If you do a bodyweight pull-up on a stable object like a bar, the only moving object is your body. All you have to worry about is pulling your body to reach the bar.

With the rings, you can't rely on the stability of a bar; you have to stabilize the rings while also pulling your body up to meet them. This requires more control, tension, concentration, and effort.

You can't just jump on the rings and let your mind wander as you pump out the reps. This in itself is a major benefit to using them. As any experienced bodybuilder will attest, the mind-muscle connection is both real and highly effective at changing your physique, and it is front and center in ring training.

Right away, you'll notice improved muscular contraction and sensation, and even if you've been training for a while. This "new" style of training can also produce DOMS like you haven't felt since the first time you picked up a weight!

Where should I hang my rings?

One of the great advantages of rings is that they require little space. But not just any old spot will do!

  • Don't just look around for something tall enough to hold your rings. Look for something strong enough to hold your bodyweight.
  • Find a space where you can hang your rings 3-4 meters (10-13 feet) high.
  • Set your rings about shoulder-width apart or a bit wider.
  • Give yourself enough open space, in both height and width, to perform straight body movements.
  • Make sure your straps are long enough to hang low so you can do push-ups, planks, mountain climbers, dips, and other movements.
  • Kid's swing-sets can sometimes work, provided they're tall and stable enough. But some city parks have rules against adults unaccompanied by children. Don't risk a fine!
  • Sturdy tree branches can work as well, provided they're really sturdy.

Gymnastics Rings Workouts

These two routines will help familiarize you with the unique challenges and stimulus offered by the rings, and they're great for building that coveted V-shape. If you can't manage all the reps at first, don't be surprised. Keep practicing until you can manage all the reps with good form and a full range of motion on pull-ups and dips before trying anything more advanced.

Keep practicing until you can manage all the reps with good form and a full range of motion on pull-ups and dips before trying anything more advanced.

Start with the fundamentals workout, and when you're feeling confident with it, mix in the superset workout.

Ring Fundamentals Workout
  1. Top position hold 5 sets of 15 seconds, 30 sec. rest
  2. Ring dip 5 sets of 8-12 reps, 1 min. rest
  3. Reverse row sit-back 5 sets of 10-15 reps, 1 min. rest
  4. Tuck/L-sit 5 sets of 15 seconds, 30 sec. rest
  5. Ring chin-up or pull-up 5 sets of 8-12 reps, 1 min. rest

Dynamic/Isometric Superset workout
  1. Ring dip 6-8 reps of dip, with a 15-sec. top position hold in between each rep. Do this for 5 sets with 1 min. rest between sets.
  2. Reverse row sit-back 6 to 8 reps with a 15-sec. tuck/L-sit in between each rep. Do this for 5 sets with 1 minute of rest between sets.
  3. Ring chin-up or pull-up 5 sets of 8 to 12 reps, with 1 minute of rest between sets.

Exercise 1

Holding this position correctly will give you an intense triceps involvement, along with a contraction of the posterior deltoid and mid and lower trapezius. It's a great move to start your routine; it "wakes up" the upper body and core and prepares them for the work ahead.

Source: www.bodybuilding.com
Share this Post

Related posts

Parkour training for kids

Parkour training for kids

AUGUST 19, 2019

I’ve been teaching kids parkour for the last two years. Here is a top ten list of games that I have used in parkour classes…

Read More
Training for Parkour

Training for Parkour

AUGUST 19, 2019

Most people who start training in Parkour just want to start doing those big jumps they see on TV or Youtube. It’s exciting!…

Read More