Wang Zijian is struggling in

Parkour death video

This is a conscious design decision by the developers at DICE. There were a numerous ways they could have handled game overs in Mirror’s Edge, and even more ways they could have handled the death sequence they went with. For example, missing a jump could have quickly cut to black immediately, saving the player from the actual terror of falling hundreds of stories down.

Alternatively, they could have held off a second longer and record sound effects that portray the aftermath of such a fall. Instead, the screen cuts to black just mere moments away from touching the ground. The sound of wind rushing past you while gasping for air cease just as immediately. It’s death, but it’s designed for maximum impact, without venturing off the ledge of good taste.

The controlled experience is somehow even more amazing when you realize that it cuts out the exact moment the brain expects to witness actual death. It’s a testament to the game that you can find artistry in how the developers decided to portray failure, but that the process of failing is brutal enough to discourage its repetition.

How many times was the falling animation in Mirror’s Edge revisited before the developers found the perfect moment to cut to black? In a 2011 study by the University of Glasgow, neurologists have shown that the brain completes information that our eyes don’t actually see. This predictive mental imaging is partly why the sequence works as well as it does. The experience left me with an after-image of death that was never actually portrayed. The psychological sleight-of-hand by DICE is something worth examining, if only for how the game cleverly works around the myriad complications around the topic of portraying on-screen death.

Death is, after all, a subject that honestly has been trivialized by entertainment. It’s been trivialized, minimized, fictionalized. By giving the player the keys to imagining death, the effects become darker, and in a way, more moral. Mirror’s Edge: Catalyst does have problems in terms of the game’s overall pacing, narrative, and characterization. But death could have been another problem for the game, only for it to become a graceful, maybe even unintentional point of interest for representation of death in fictional media.

Source: www.inverse.com
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